Names of Korean Alphabets

Names of Korean Alphabets


 

If you take Korean classes or go to Korean schools, you will definitely come across the names of letters. To be honest, I don’t think all Korean learners must master what the letters of the alphabet are called. But if you want to figure out what letters your teachers refer to, avoid confusion in Korean materials, or study Korean academically, then follow along to learn the correct name for each. Easy and fast!

 

1. Korean Vowels

The names of vowels are the same as the sounds they produce. Korean characters must consist of at least one consonant and one vowel. When we add ㅇ to a vowel, it acts as a filler, as it produces no sound when found at the beginning of a word.

VowelsSoundName
[a]
[ya]
[eo]
[yeo]
[o]
[yo]
[u]
[yu]
[eu]
[i]
[e]
[ye]
[e]
[ye]
[wa]
[we]
[we]
[weo]
[we]
[wi]
[eui]

 

2. Korean Consonants

Fortunately, most consonant names are formed using the same formula: consonant + ㅣ + 으 + consonant.

 

Just remember, there are 3 exceptions with their own unique names – ㄱ, ㄷ, ㅅ. These are the ones you’ll find marked with an asterisk.  Also, Korean letters have 5 double consonants – ㄲ, ㄸ, ㅃ, ㅆ, ㅉ. Remember, for double consonants, just add 쌍 [ssang] meaning ‘twin’ in front of the names. This indicates that the same letter is repeated twice. They are marked with two asterisks below.

ConsonantsSoundNameSound
[g/k]기역*[giyeok]
[gg/kk]쌍기역**[ssanggiyeok]
[n]니은[nieun]
[d/t]디귿*[digeut]
[dd/tt]쌍디귿**[ssangdigeut]
[l/r]리을[lieul]
[m]미음[mieum]
[b/p]비읍[bieub]
[bb/pp]쌍비읍**[ssangbieub]
[s]시옷*[siot]
[ss]쌍시옷**[ssangsiot]
[null/~ng]이응[ieung]
[j/ch]지읒[jieut]
[jj]쌍지읒**[ssangjieut]
[ch]치읓[chieut]
[k]키읔[kieuk]
[t]티읕[tieut]
[p]피읖[pieup]
[h]히읗[hieut]